Raising Chickens in Jambi

coop

328 Foot Long Chicken Coop

During a recent journey around the Jambi Province we happened upon a chicken farm close to the Village of Bajubang Darat. This farm is managed by Pak (Mr.) Abdul Rahmat and his wife Ibu (Mrs.) Wati.

This husband and wife couple (with their 2 daughters—13 and 5 years old) have been raising chickens since 2006. They now raise 7,000 chickens during a 33 (or 45) day time period. After the chickens are up to weight they are shipped off for processing then another 7,000 chicks are brought in to start the process over again.

Floors Made of Split Bamboo Slats

Floors Made of Split Bamboo Slats

Additional Info About Raising the Chickens

Pak Abdul and Ibu Wati operate this business on a contract basis with the business they called ETB (they didn’t know its complete name).

The split bamboo floors of the “chicken coops” are positioned 2 meters (6.5 feet) off the ground. The size of their largest coop, which holds 5,000 chickens, is 9 meters wide (26 ½ feet) and 100 meters long (328 feet). Their second coop that holds 2,000 chickens is a little smaller. The coops have thatched roofs.

Chicken Coop with Thatched Roof

Chicken Coop with Thatched Roof

Pak Abdul said that if they feed the chickens rice they won’t gain enough weight, so they are fed a prepared food they called pete (pay tay), which is often spelled petai. We’re not positive, but this could be the well known and often seen bean used in many Indonesian dishes, which in English is called a bitter bean, stink bean, or twisted cluster bean (Parkia speciosa).

Pak Abdul & Ibu Wati's home, with one of the chicken coops to the left.

Pak Abdul & Ibu Wati’s home, with one of the chicken coops to the left.

It’s possible this couple are uniformed about the contents of the feed that is provided for them to give to the chickens. The feed probably contains a mixture of various ingredients like: corn, soybean meal, rice bran, animal by product meal, rapeseed meal, etc., etc.

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After the chickens are up to weight they are loaded onto trucks and shipped off for processing. Before a new shipment of chicks arrive, to start the process all over again, the coops are sprayed with an antiseptic they called paralon.

Village Chickens

Our article about chickens raised privately can be read by clicking this link.

Our article about fried chicken can be read by clicking this link.

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